Once a summer

This post is part of the July 2013 Blog Chain at Absolute Write. This month’s prompt is “Dog Days of Summer.”

„Dog days“ of summer are literally translated into „Hundstage“ in German. We do not see them there every year, often as not summer in Germany is more a wish than a reality. But still, sometimes they happen.

Like in that summer when I had turned nine and we had moved into a new bought house. This came with a room for each of us two sisters and enough space to accomodate our cousins during the summer holidays. I loved it – having my two big cousins around who would treat me nicely and include me in everything made my day, no matter, what my elder sister and the youngest of the cousins were up to.

We would play crocket in the garden, although we had to fight the balls tendency to roll downhills, as the house is built into a hillside. Or we would search for the badminton set. Evenings would find us on the terrace with two sets of cards, for interminable rounds of canasta, under the sweet smell of the yasmine bushes and roses at the wall.

The weather grew warmer and warmer and saw us searching for a pool. The five of us would hardly fit into the family car, a beetle, because none was old enough to drive and my mother would not risk being caught with all of us on board. So the heat and lack of alternative forced us to use the local swimming pool. The entry fee was minimal, but so was the pool. Much too small, hardly a decent shower, raw stones on the edges. The lack of heating did not count in those hot days, we were happy enough with the temperature the sun had made raise to incredible 18° C. Then, the use of balls and other playthings were not yet forbidden, the water teemed with children, the heavily chlorinated water permeated the air with its acrid smell that we would take home in our wet bathing suits and towels.

Until one day, when in the morning we saw the sky covered with clouds and a cool wind greeted us as soon as we opened the door. But we had decided the evening before that we would go swimming again and I counted on another swimming lesson from my patient cousin. So, I would not hear of not going and the others also agreed that the clouds should not be a reason to deter us from enjoying another swim.

The water felt actually warmer under the leaden sky, as long as I did not leave a limb out to the wind. After one hour though we tried to dry up, my long hair still dripping with water I followed the others on the way home. I shivered, but tried not to show it for fear they would tell me it was my own mistake as I had been the one to insist on going.

I paid for this next morning when I woke up with a terrible headache, fever and a sore throat. The next week I had to spend confined in bed, while the others now could go everywhere as the four of them would fit into the car. To comfort me at least a little my cousins would buy sweets for me and, better, give me their own new books – that they had brought to read during the holidays – to read. They knew I would enjoy them.

The youngest had brought the „Winnetou“-Triology. Very famous in Germany I doubt my englishspeaking reades will ever had heard of their author, Karl May, who wrote a big number of storys from his fictous travels, a part of them set into the Wild West, another in the Middle East and Africa. Three big volumes kept my interest for a while and I cared less about being left alone after the fever abated sufficiently so I could concentrate on reading.

But it was the elder cousins book that I still remember best and that still helds a special place in my heart for the lasting effect it had on me: a German version of Lousia May Alcott’s „Little Women“. Never before I had thought about people who wrote the books I read, and I had started reading with four years of age and found my way through a number of books already. But Jo March did not only read them, she started writing stories and had them published, for others to enjoy them.

It needed years until I wrote my first story and still my first book waits to get published. But I always think of those dog days of summer that not only taught me to swim but also how to use my storytelling.

 

Check out this month’s other bloggers, all of whom have posted or will post their own responses:
Ralph Pines
articshark
Sunwords
Diem_Allen
U2Girl
robynmackenzie
Lady Cat
MsLaylaCakes
pyrosama
Angyl78
SuzanneSeese
Diana_Rajchel
HistorySleuth
AshleyEpidemic
SRHowen

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13 thoughts on “Once a summer

    1. rheinsberg Post author

      I also liked it in winter 😉 – somehow it is timeless. When I first read it, I had no idea of the Civil War and the rest of the historic background, I only understood these parts much later.

      Reply
  1. Tara Quan

    Reading a ton of romances (well, and manga) was how I spent almost all my summer breaks growing up. I still miss having all that free time.

    Reply
    1. rheinsberg Post author

      I used to read whatever I could find. Some years, though, I was a helper in the local library, open once a week for two hours. But maybe this is another blog-post 😉

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Dog Days of Summer – Absolute Write Blog Chain July 2013 | Tara Quan

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  4. Pingback: Diana Rajchel » Absolute Write: the Dog Days of Summer (FICTION POST)

    1. rheinsberg Post author

      Thank you. I am happy you read it like this – I am still not so very happy with the piece, it seems to be missing some of the heat and smell of hot street and sudden rain and dry grass and chloride in the swimming pool.

      Reply
  5. Pingback: Writing Exercise: Dog Days of Summer | Elvin Bala

  6. alexp01

    I do enjoy reading about the summer memories of people from other countries, especially when they involve pastimes like cricket that we Americans simply don’t indulge in. Interesting to see that you preserved the German style quotation marks even when writing in English as well 🙂

    Reply
    1. rheinsberg Post author

      You caught me – I wrote this text in word, with German spell-check, and then it sets the quotation marks automatically. Thank you for pointing it out, I will have to take care when writing in English.

      Reply

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